A World Heritage Site is a landmark or area which has been officially recognized by the United Nations, specifically by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). Sites are selected on the basis of having cultural, historical, scientific or some other form of significance, and they are legally protected by international treaties. UNESCO regards these sites as being important to the collective interests of humanity.Since joining the International Convention Concerning the Protection of World Cultural and Natural Heritage in 1985, China has 50 world heritage sites to date; of these 35 are cultural heritage sites, 11 are natural heritage sites, and 4 are cultural and natural (mixed) sites, ranking second in the world.


Highlights of World Heritage

Forbidden City( 故宫): is the Chinese imperial palace from the Ming dynasty to the end of the Qing dynasty—the years 1420 to 1912.It served as the home of emperors and their households as well as the ceremonial and political center of Chinese government for almost 500 years,constructed from 1406 to 1420.



Great Wall (长城): is a series of fortifications made of stone, brick, rammed earth, wood, and other materials, generally built along an east-to-west line across the historical northern borders of China to protect the Chinese statesand empires against the raids and invasions of the various nomadic groups of the Eurasian Steppe. Several walls were being built as early as the 7th century BCE;these, later joined together and made bigger and stronger, are now collectively referred to as the Great Wall. Especially famous is the wall built 220–206 BCE by Qin Shi Huang, the first Emperor of China. Little of that wall remains. Since then, the Great Wall has been rebuilt, maintained, and enhanced; the majority of the existing wall is from the Ming Dynasty (1368–1644).


Terracotta Army (兵马俑): literally: "Soldier-and-horse funerary statues") is a collection of terracotta sculptures depicting the armies of Qin Shi Huang, the first Emperor of China. It is a form of funerary art buried with the emperor in 210–209 BCE and whose purpose was to protect the emperor in his afterlife.



Mount Emei ( 峨眉山) : is a mountain in Sichuan Province, China, and is one of the Four Sacred Buddhist Mountains of China. Mt. Emei sits at the western rim of the Sichuan Basin. At 3,099 metres (10,167 ft), Mt. Emei is the highest of the Four Sacred Buddhist Mountains of China.


World Heritage Tour